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All posts tagged law

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Book Preview – Understanding The Rhetorical Forms of the Culture Wars (Cathleen Kaveny)

Cathleen Kaveeny.  Prophecy Without Contempt:  Religious Discourse in the Public Square.  Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2016.  Hardcover.  464 pp.  ISBN-10:0674495039. The following is a book preview by the author. In a nutshell, the thesis of my new book Prophecy Without Contempt: Religious Discourse in the Public Square is that […]

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Outrage In Missouri Town After Police Shooting Of 18-Yr-Old Man

Undermining Equal Protection (R. Ward Holder)

In the 17th of July, 2014, Eric Garner died after being placed in a chokehold by Staten Island police during his arrest for the suspicion of selling loose cigarettes. Less than a month later, on August 9th, Michael Brown was shot to death in an altercation with Darren Wilson, a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. Both cases raised significant concerns about civil rights, about the possible militarization of policing in American cities, and about the treatment of minority communities by white police officers and white police forces. In response to the furor that arose, the two district attorneys, Robert McCulloch in Ferguson and Dan Donovan in Staten Island, sought to quell community distrust by going to extraordinary measures.

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Reasoning about Exceptions – Editorial for Political Theology 15.5

One of the most important tasks for political theologians today is the cultivation of capacities for democratic reasoning about exceptions to the rule of law. The task is important because liberal societies face – or at least believe they face – a number of threats that seem to require exceptional measures in response. The pressure to make exceptions grows stronger, even as we find ourselves with fewer and weaker resources for thinking about them.

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gaza destruction

Gaza, Ukraine, and the Limits of International Law (Paul W. Kahn)

Since World War II, the primary ambition of international humanitarian law — the law of armed conflict — has been to insulate military violence from the civilian population. Military forces are required to identify themselves as such, by wearing clearly marked uniforms, and to discriminate in their selection of targets: They cannot deliberately attack noncombatants or infrastructure that has no military use.

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14-07-05 - Valentin de Boulogne - Saint Paul Writing His Epistles

The Politics of Individual Responsibility and the Structures of Sin—Romans 7:15-25a (Richard Davis)

Paul speaks to our self-conscious understanding of tragic fatedness in Romans 7. Like him we long to be released from such an apparent fate, where we are not free to live as we know we could and should. This is more than an individual bondage to sin. It recognizes that sometimes we are prevented from living as we feel we ought by more than our own will; sometimes we are oppressed by the wills of others or even a system which seems to have a will of its own that is impermeable to reason.

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Lady Justice stands on the street corner beside a set of wind chimes.

Thomistic Virtue Jurisprudence and a National Carbon Tax – Daniel R. DiLeo

While many analysts contend that a carbon tax is the most effective and efficient climate change mitigation policy available to the U.S., one of the most significant obstacles to the legislation of a national carbon tax in the U.S. is American’s basic aversion to taxation. In view of Americans’ antipathy towards taxation, the Thomistic virtue jurisprudence proposed by Cathleen Kaveny in her book Law’s Virtues can dispose Americans to support a national carbon tax.

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