Political Theology Today A forum for interdisciplinary and interreligious dialogue

All posts tagged Carl Schmitt

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Political Theology Needs Its Own “Pivot To Asia” (Kwok Pui-Lan)

This essay first appeared as part of an announcement for the print journal Political Theology in July, 2016.  It is reprinted here because of its timeliness.  The original posting can be found here. When scholars discuss modern political theology, they usually refer to Carl Schmitt’s book Political Theology as the founding […]

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What Is The New “Nomos of the Earth”? Reflections on the Later Schmitt (Carl Raschke)

German jurist and philosopher Carl Schmitt, who coined the term “political theology”, is best known for his seminal works in the 1920s that dealt with such familiar concepts as sovereignty, the “state of exception”, and the “friend-enemy” distinction. But his later thought, developed in writings in the two decades after […]

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Donald Trump and the Theopolitics of Ineffable Power (Daniel Miller)

Donald Trump’s political rise continues to confound pundits and political thinkers, retaining a sense of mystery that has accompanied his campaign since early in the nomination process. Time and time again, Trump has made bold pronouncements, statements of extreme grandiosity, statements that seem impossible, contradictory, or both. When pressed on […]

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The Political Theology Syllabi Project: Inese Radzins

My interest in teaching a course on Political Theology came from my research on Simone Weil. I wanted to understand how the area of political theology could help me interpret Weil’s oeuvre, which often focuses on the intersection of politics and religion. To that end I decided to teach a course in the Fall of 2011 that would explore the historic development of the concept “political theology.” The course would consider how the western tradition has “thought” the intersection of politics/theology.

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Weird John Brown: A Response to Cavanaugh, Day, Holifield, Murphy, and Ochs (by Ted Smith)

. . . In the book I think about what it would mean to see Brown as a “Great Criminal” who did wrong but can still be read as a sign of a divine violence that breaks the hold of the slave system on social imaginations and so makes possible not just new ways of seeing the world, but new ways of acting, new ways of connecting with others, and new ways of deliberating together.

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John Brown: Madman? Terrorist? Righteous warrior? (Peter Ochs)

Ted Smith delivers an unprecedented thesis about Brown’s violent assault on slaveholders as the human side of a “divine violence.” From beyond the limits of any earthly system of political justice and social ethics, this is a divine judgment against the validity of an entire system of political ethics. Addressed, for one, to American ethicists today — both those who teach and study in the university and those who voice their ethical judgments on street corners, in churches, and across the Sunday dinner table — Smith’s words, while gently spoken, deliver their own report of divine judgment.

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Weird John Brown and the Uses of Elusiveness (E. Brooks Holifield)

In conjunction with the Marginalia (part of the LA Review of Books), Political Theology Today has organized a symposium on Ted Smith’s extraordinary new book Weird John Brown: Divine Violence and the Limits of Ethics. Over the coming two and a half weeks, we will host responses to the book from E. Brooks Holifield, William Cavanaugh, Peter Ochs, Keri Day, and Andrew Murphy, concluding with a response to the responses by author Ted Smith. Here is the first response, from E. Brooks Holifield of Emory University.

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