Political Theology Today A Forum for inter-disciplinary and inter-religious dialogue among clergy, scholars, students, and activists

All posts by Michael Jaycox

It’s All about the Baby Boomers: Looking beyond Political Posturing to Power Relations in Liberal Protestantism

A critical issue left unaddressed in Bass’s response to Douthat is the state of power relations within mainline Protestant denominations. In her well-intentioned attempt to counteract the corrosive and controlling ‘narrative of decline’ that plagues mainline Protestant communities, she inadvertently diverts attention away from the reality that the majority of their leadership positions and financial resources are firmly in the control of the Baby Boomer generation….

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Visions of Hope Conference at Boston College

Of potential interest to those who follow There Is Power in the Blog: The Theology Graduate Student Association of Boston College, in partnership with the Church in the 21st Century Center and ICMICA/Pax Romana, will be hosting a conference entitled, “Visions of Hope: Emerging Theologians and Young Church Leaders Envision […]

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Newt Gingrich and Catholic Virtue Ethics

As the Iowa Caucus approaches, increased attention is being paid to the religious affiliations of the candidates for the Republican presidential nomination. Much of this discussion has centered upon Mitt Romney’s Mormonism, but the media has also paid a significant amount of attention to Newt Gingrich’s Catholicism. The latest round of controversy in the mainstream media began with Laurie Goodstein’s New York Times piece, in which she speculated about whether Gingrich’s 2009 conversion to Catholicism fits into a broader shift towards the right for Catholic participation in American politics in the post-Kennedy era. Likewise, Barbara Bradley Hagerty’s NPR piece narrated the details of his conversion process, highlighting the pivotal role of his current wife, Callista, as well as his attraction to the intellectual tradition of the Church.

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